Japanese National Anthem Kimigayo – Smartphone App

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Latest Version:
1.3 – Release on 2013-11-20

About this android app:
This japanese app by Sanjaal Corps lets you play the beautiful Japanese National Anthem “Kimigayo Wa” on your phone. The voice is crystal clear with a high quality mp3 and the app looks great. We have provided the lyrics in variety of forms – Japanese, Romanized English and Translated English. App also contains the history and further information of the anthem in addition to the musical note.

Please note that the User Interface is in English – so anyone from around the globe can download the app and be able to use it. This app is completely free but contains advertisement. If you get offended with the advertisements, we urge you not to install this app.

SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.android.japanese.anthem

Contact Us:
If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

Screenshots:
screenshot-japanese-national-anthem-android-app-version-1.0-image-001

screenshot-japanese-national-anthem-android-app-version-1.0-image-002

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About Japanese National Anthem:
“Kimigayo” is the national anthem of Japan and the world’s oldest lyrics in a national anthem. From 1868 to 1945, it served as the national anthem of the Empire of Japan. With a length of 11 measures and 32 characters, “Kimigayo” is also one of the world’s shortest national anthems currently in use. Its lyrics are based on a waka poem written in the Heian period (794-1185), sung to a melody written in the imperial period (1868-1945). The current melody was chosen in 1880, replacing an unpopular melody composed eleven years earlier. While the title “Kimigayo” is usually translated as His Majesty’s Reign, no official translation of the title nor lyrics has ever been established by law.

Prior to 1945, “Kimigayo” served as the national anthem of the Empire of Japan, however, when the Empire of Japan was dissolved following its surrender at the end of World War II, its parliamentary democracy successor state, the State of Japan, replaced it in 1945, the polity therefore changed from a system based on imperial sovereignty to one based on popular sovereignty. However, Emperor Hirohito was not dethroned, and “Kimigayo” was retained as the de facto national anthem, only becoming legally recognized as the official national anthem in 1999, with the passage of Act on National Flag and Anthem.

Since Japan’s period of parliamentary democracy began, there has been controversy over the performance of the “Kimigayo” anthem at public ceremonies. Along with the Japanese Hinomaru flag, “Kimigayo” has been claimed by those critical of it to be a symbol of Japanese nationalism, imperialism and militarism, with debate over whether “Kimigayo”, as a remnant of the Empire of Japan’s imperialist past, is compatible with a contemporary Japanese parliamentary democracy. Thus, the essential points of the controversies regarding the Hinomaru flag and “Kimigayo” are whether they express praise or condemnation to the Empire of Japan and whether the Empire of Japan (pre-1945) and postwar Japan (post-1945) are the same states or different states.

[Text Source: Wikipedia / Creative Commons]

Release Notes:


v1.3
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 6.1
+ Fixed some performance issues

v1.2
+ Fixed an issue with AppFire that handles application crash analytics

v1.0 - Initial Release
+ High Quality Mp3 Audio
+ Ability to play, pause and stop the anthem
+ Musical Note Included
+ Lyrics in Japanese, Romanized English and Translated English
+ History of the anthem included
+ Beautifully designed user interface
+ Very patriotic background with Japanese Flag
+ Completely free - but is ad supported.

Sri Lankan National Anthem (Android App)

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Latest Version:
1.2

About this android app:
This app lets you play the patriotic national anthem of Sri Lanka (Sri Lanka Matha) on your android phone. Included sound quality is awesome. We have also provided lyrics in both Roman English form as well as translated English language.

You can play/pause or stop the Anthem. The sound keeps playing int he background as you are navigating through the application once you started it from the landing page. There is a history of anthem on who wrote it and how it began for those seekers of the knowledge.

If you play music, we have also provided musical notations in this app.
This is an app every Sri Lankan people should have on their android phone. Give it a try and give us feedbacks and suggestions for improvement.

SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.android.srilankannationalanthem

Contact Us:
If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

Screenshots:
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About Sri Lankan National Anthem:
Sri Lanka Matha is the national anthem of Sri Lanka. The song was written and composed by the Ananda Samarakoon in 1940, and was later adopted as the national anthem in 1951. It was written when Sri Lanka was still a British colony and was initially written as a tribute to Sri Lanka, expressing sentiments of freedom, unity and independence, and not for the purpose of serving as a national anthem. The song however became very popular throughout the 1940s and when Sri Lanka gained independence in 1948 it was chosen to be the national anthem, 3 years later. The first independence day it was sung was in 1952. Ananda Samarakoon was Rabindranath Tagore’s student and the tune is influenced by Tagore’s genre of music.

The song was officially adopted as the national anthem of Ceylon on November 22, 1951, by a committee headed by Sir Edwin Wijeyeratne. The anthem was translated into the Tamil language by M. Nallathamby.

The first line of the anthem originally read: Namo Namo Matha, Apa Sri Lanka. There was some controversy over these words in the 1950s, and in 1961 they were changed to their present form, Sri Lanka Matha, Apa Sri Lanka, without Samarakoon’s consent. Samarakoon committed suicide in 1962 apparently due to the change in words.The Second Republican Constitution of 1978 gave Sri Lanka Matha constitutional recognition.

The Sri Lankan national anthem is one of a number that are sung in more than one language: Canada (English, French & Inuktitut), Belgium (French, Dutch & German), Switzerland (German, French, Italian & Romansh), South Africa (Xhosa, Zulu, Sesotho, Afrikaans & English), Suriname (Dutch and Sranan Tongo), and New Zealand (English & Maori). The majority of Sri Lankans (more than 80%) speak the Sinhala language and the Sinhala version is mainly used in Sri Lanka for public and private events. This version is the only version used during international sports and other events. Due to popularity of the song and it’s rich meaning, it’s being translated into several other languages. Although the Sinhala version of the anthem is used at official/state events, the Tamil translation is also sung at some events. The Tamil translation is used at official events held in the Tamil speaking regions in the North and East of Sri Lanka. The Tamil translation is sung at Tamil medium schools throughout the country. The Tamil translation was used even during the period when Sinhala was the only official language of the country (1956 – 87).

The Sri Lankan anthem’s tune is similar to a Hindu devotional song Jai Jagdish Hare. But No references still known about the co-incidence between both them. It is said that on Ananda Samarakoon’s request, Rabindranath Tagore wrote this song in Bengali, later translated by Ananda into Sinhala language.

[Text Source: Wikipedia / Creative Commons]

Release Notes:
v1.2
+ Removed the Notification Bar advertisement to comply with Google’s app policy
+ Removed the Home Icon advertisement to comply with Google’s App Policy
+ Added feature to allow users to rate the app after certain usage
+ Modified the look to have golden background for buttons and some text fields
+ Added Special Offers section with recommendations of some free cool apps
+ Fixed some bugs that caused the app to crash on certain phones
+ LeadBolt 1.5a used

Brazilian National Anthem – Smartphone Application

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Latest Version:
1.6 – released on 2013-12-11

About this android app:
“Brazilian National Anthem” is an android application written for android based smartphones and tablets. This mobile application lets you play the patriotic national anthem “Ouviram Do Ipiranga As Margens Placidas” of Brazil in your android based devices – both phones and tablets. This application is developed by professionals at Sanjaal Corps laboratory. The musical note diagram and the anthem history below is courtesy of Wikipedia.The flags of Brazil and the national anthem music are used under “fair usage” policy and Sanjaal Corps neither has the right to the flag, nor to the lyrics, audio and the musical notations.

SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.android.braziliannationalanthem

You can download this app by scanning the following QR code from your android phone.

qr_code_brazilian_national_anthem

Contact Us:
If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

Screenshots:

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

About Brazilian National Anthem:

The Brazilian national anthem (Portuguese: Hino Nacional Brasileiro) was composed by Francisco Manuel da Silva in 1831 and had been given at least two sets of unofficial lyrics before a 1922 decree by President Epitácio Pessoa gave the anthem its definitive, official lyrics, by Joaquim Osório Duque-Estrada, after several changes were made to his proposal, written in 1909. The anthem’s lyrics have been described as Parnassian in style and Romantic in content.The melody of the Brazilian national anthem was composed by Francisco Manuel da Silva and was presented to the public for the first time in April 1831. On 7 April 1831, the first Brazilian Emperor, Pedro I, abdicated the Crown and days later left for Europe, leaving behind the then-five-year-old Emperor Pedro II. From the proclamation of the independence of Brazil in 1822 until the 1831 abdication, an anthem that had been composed by Pedro I himself, celebrating the country’s independence (and that now continues to be an official patriotic song, the Independence Anthem), was used as the National Anthem. In the immediate aftermath of the abdication of Pedro I, the Anthem composed by him fell in popularity.

Francisco Manuel da Silva then seized this opportunity to present his composition, and the Anthem written by him was played in public for the first time on 13 April 1831. On that same day, the ship carrying the former Emperor left the port of Rio de Janeiro. The date of April 13 now appears in official calendars as the Day of the Brazilian National Anthem. As to the actual date of composition of the music presented in April 1831, there is controversy among historians. Some hold that Francisco Manuel da Silva composed the music in the last four months of 1822 to commemorate Brazil’s independence (declared on 7 September 1822), others hold that the hymn was written in early 1823 and others consider the evidence of composition dating back to 1822 or 1823 unreliable, and hold that the Anthem presented on 13 April 1831 was written in 1831, and not before. In any event, the Anthem remained in obscurity until it was played in public on 13 April 1831. In style, the music resembles early Romantic Italian music such as that of Gioachino Rossini. Initially, the music composed by Francisco Manuel da Silva was given lyrics by Appeals Judge Ovídio Saraiva de Carvalho e Silva not as a National Anthem, but as a hymn commemorating the abdication of Pedro I and the accession of Pedro II to the Throne. It was known during this early period as “April 7 Hymn”. The lyrics by Ovídio Saraiva soon fell out of use, given that they were considered poor, and even offensive towards the Portuguese. The music, however, continued enjoying sustained popularity, and by 1837 it was played, without lyrics, in all public ceremonies.

Although no statute was passed during the imperial period to declare Francisco Manuel da Silva’s musical composition as the National Anthem, no formal enactment was considered necessary for the adoption of a National Anthem. A National Anthem was seen as resulting from praxis or tradition. Thus, by 1837, when it was played in all official solemnities, Francisco Manuel da Silva’s composition was already the Brazilian National Anthem. A new set of lyrics was proposed in 1841, to commemorate the coming of age and Coronation of Emperor Pedro II; those lyrics, popular but also considered poor, were soon abandoned too, this time by order of Emperor Pedro II, who specified that in public ceremonies the Anthem should be played with no lyrics. Emperor Pedro II directed that Francisco Manuel da Silva’s composition, as the National Anthem of the Empire of Brazil, should be played, without lyrics, on all occasions when the monarch presented himself in public, and in solemnities of military or civilian nature; the composition was also played abroad in diplomatic events relating to Brazil or when the Brazilian Emperor was present.

During the Empire of Brazil era, the American composer and pianist Louis Moreau Gottschalk, then residing in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, composed two nationalistic works of classical music based on the Brazilian National Anthem that achieved great popularity during the imperial period: the Brazilian Solemn March (“Marcha Solene Brasileira”, in the modern Portuguese spelling or “Marcha Solemne Brazileira”, in the original spelling in force at the time of composition) and the Great Triumphal Fantasy on the Brazilian National Anthem (“Grande Fantasia Triunfal sobre o Hino Nacional Brasileiro”). The former was dedicated to Emperor Pedro II, and the latter was dedicated to his heiress presumptive, the Princess Imperial Isabel, comtesse d’Eu. Those works are in the vein of similar compositions written at the time in other Nations, such as Charles Gounod’s Fantasy on the Russian National Anthem. The Grand Triumphal Fantasy, long forgotten, resurfaced in popularity in 1985, at the dawn of Brazil’s New Republic, during the country’s re-democratization process, when it was played to accompany the funeral cortège of President Tancredo Neves. After the Proclamation of the Republic in 1889, the new rulers made a competition in order to choose a new anthem, and the competition was won by Leopoldo Miguez. After protests against the adoption of the proposed new anthem, however, the Head of the Provisional Government, Deodoro da Fonseca, formalized Francisco Manuel da Silva’s composition as the National Anthem, while Miguez’s composition was deemed the Anthem of the Proclamation of the Republic. Dedoro himself was said to prefer the old anthem to the new composition that became the Anthem of the Proclamation of the Republic. The Decree of the Provisional Government (Decree 171 of 1890) confirming Francisco Manuel da Silva’s music, that had served as the National Anthem of the Empire of Brazil, as the National Anthem of the new Republic, was issued on 20 January 1890.

In the early days of the new Federal Republic, the National Anthem continued without official lyrics, but several lyrics were proposed, and some were even adopted by different states of Brazil. The lack of uniform, official lyrics would only be terminated in 1922, during the celebrations of the first centennial of the Proclamation of Independence, when an adapted version of Joaquim Osório Duque Estrada’s lyrics, first proposed in 1909, were deemed official. The official lyrics of the Brazilian National Anthem were proclaimed by decree of President Epitácio Pessoa (Decree 15.761 of 1922), issued on 6 September 1922, at the height of the celebrations of the Independence Centennial. This presidential decree was issued in execution of a legislative decree adopted by Congress on 21 August 1922. The National Anthem is considered by the current Constitution of Brazil, adopted in 1988, one of the four national symbols of the country, along with the Flag, the Coat of Arms and the National Seal. The legal norms currently in force concerning the National Anthem are contained in a statute passed in 1971 (Law 5.700 of 1 September 1971), regulating the national symbols. The music of the National Anthem was originally intended to be played by symphonic orchestras; for the playing of the National Anthem by bands, the march composed by Antão Fernandes is included in the instrumentation. This adaptation, long in use, was made official by the 1971 statute regulating national symbols. This same statute also confirmed as official the traditional vocal adaptation of the lyrics of the National Anthem, in F major, composed by Alberto Nepomuceno.

[Text Source: Wikipedia / Creative Commons]

Release Notes:
v1.6
+ Upgraded to Leadbolt 6.1 to fix some ad related and performance problems reported by users.

v1.5
+ UI Changes – Completely changed the Look and Feel to match Brazilian Flag colors
+ Added Free Apps Section
+ Fixed an issue with AppFire

v1.4
+ Fixed an error with exiting an application
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 6
+ Added AppFire for better analytics

v1.3
+ Removed the Notification Bar advertisement to comply with Google’s app policy
+ Removed the Home Icon advertisement to comply with Google’s App Policy
+ Added feature to allow users to rate the app after certain usage
+ Modified the look to have golden background for buttons and some text fields
+ Added Special Offers section with recommendations of some free cool apps
+ Fixed some bugs that caused the app to crash on certain phones
+ LeadBolt 1.5a used

Nepali National Anthem – Smartphone Application

 

Latest Version:
1.7 – released 2013-12-13

About this android app:
“Nepali National Anthem” is an android application written for android based smartphones and tablets. This mobile application lets you play the patriotic national anthem “Sayaoun Thunga Phool Ka Hami” of Republic of Nepal in your android based devices – both phones and tablets. This application is developed by professionals at Sanjaal Corps laboratory. The musical note diagram is a courtesy of Wikipedia.The flags of Nepal and the national anthem music are used under “fair usage” policy and Sanjaal Corps neither has the right to the flag, nor to the lyrics, audio and the musical notations. The sound quality is pretty high definition and you can read the lyrics in English, romanized english along with Nepali language itself

SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.android.nepalianthem

You can scan the following QR code with your android device to download this app.
qr_code_nepali_national_anthem

Contact Us:
If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

screen-shot-nepali-national-anthem-android-app-version-1.5-image-001

Screenshot – Nepali National Anthem Android App

Screenshots:

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Screenshot – Nepali National Anthem Android App

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Screenshot – Nepali National Anthem Android App

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Screenshot – Nepali National Anthem Android App

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Screenshot – Nepali National Anthem Android App

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Screenshot – Nepali National Anthem Android App

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Screenshot – Nepali National Anthem Android App

About Nepali National Anthem:

After the unanimous decision on May 19, 2006, by the House of Representatives (Pratinidhi Sabha) of the Kingdom of Nepal, the old national anthem was suspended. The National Anthem Selection Task Team (NASTT) on 30 November 2006, selected poet Byakul Maila’s (real name: Pradeep Kumar Rai) song as the new national anthem of Nepal. The new national anthem was selected from a total of 1272 submissions made from across the country. It was officially approved on 20 April 2007.On August 3, 2007, Sayaun Thunga Phool Ka was officially declared as Nepal’s national anthem by the House of Representatives.

Release Notes:
v1.7
+ Upgraded to Leadbolt 6.1 – This will server ads faster without freezing the application

v1.6
+ Fixed a bug that prevented users from normally exiting the app
+ Added AppFire for better analytics of App Crashes
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 6.0
+ Added ways to re-engage users

v1.5
+ Revamped User Interface
+ Added Lyrics in Nepali
+ Re-worked on Musical Notes
+ Added Direct Download links to our other Nepali applications.
+ Removed the Notification Bar advertisement to comply with Google’s app policy
+ Removed the Home Icon advertisement to comply with Google’s App Policy
+ Added feature to allow users to rate the app after certain usage
+ Modified the look to have golden background for buttons and some text fields
+ Added Special Offers section with recommendations of some free cool apps
+ Fixed some bugs that caused the app to crash on certain phones

Indonesian National Anthem – Smartphone Application

Latest Version:
1.7 released on 2013-12-12

About this android app:
“Indonesian National Anthem” is an android application written for android based smartphones and tablets. This mobile application lets you play the patriotic national anthem “Indonesia Tanah Airku” of Indonesia in your android based devices – both phones and tablets. This application is developed by professionals at Sanjaal Corps laboratory. The musical note diagram is a courtesy of Wikipedia.The flags of Indonesia and the national anthem music are used under “fair usage” policy and Sanjaal Corps neither has the right to the flag, nor to the lyrics, audio and the musical notations.

SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.android.indonesiananthem

You can scan the following QR code on your android device to download this app.

qr_code_indonesian_national_anthem

Contact Us:
If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

Screenshots:
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About Indonesian National Anthem:
Indonesia Raya is the national anthem of the Republic of Indonesia. The song was introduced by its composer, Wage Rudolf Supratman, on 28 October 1928 during the Second Indonesian Youth Congress in Batavia. The song marked the birth of the all-archipelago nationalist movement in Indonesia that supported the idea of one single “Indonesia” as successor to the Dutch East Indies, rather than split into several colonies.

The first stanza of Indonesia Raya was chosen as the national anthem when Indonesia proclaimed its independence at 17 August 1945.

Indonesia Raya is played in flag raising ceremonies. The flag is raised in a solemn and timed motion so that it reaches the top of the flagpole as the anthem ends. The main flag raising ceremony is held annually on 17 August to commemorate Independence day. The ceremony is led by the President of Indonesia.

In 1928, youths from across Indonesia held the first Indonesian Youth Congress, an official meeting to push for the independence of the nation. Upon hearing about the efforts, young reporter Wage Rudolf Supratman contacted the organizers of Congress with the intention of reporting the story, but they requested that he not publish the story from fear of Dutch colonial authorities. The organizers wanted to avoid suspicion so that the Dutch would not ban the event. Supratman promised them this, and the organizers allowed him free access to the event. Supratman, who was also a musician and also a teacher, was inspired by the meetings and intended to write a song for the conference. After receiving encouragement from the conference leader Sugondo Djojopuspito, Supratman played on the violin the song Indonesia with the hope that it would someday become a national anthem. He kept the script to himself because he felt that it was not the appropriate time to announce it.

Supratman first performed Indonesia on the violin on 28 October 1928 during the Second Indonesian Youth Congress.

Release Notes:
v1.7
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 6.1 to fix an issue with slow loading of advertisements or even freezing the application.

v1.6
+ Now you can see the anthem lyrics in translated English.
+ Added the anthem history information.
+ Fixed an bug that prevented users from normal exit out of the application
+ Fixed an issue with slow performance
+ Added AppFire for better Analytics
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 6

v1.5
+ Removed the Notification Bar and Home Icon advertisement to comply with Google’s app policy
+ Added feature to allow users to rate the app after certain usage
+ Modified the look and feel slightly
+ Added Special Offers section with recommendations of some free cool apps
+ Fixed some bugs that caused the app to crash on certain phones