Nepali Forex Pro (Smartphone App)

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Latest Version:
1.2

About this android app:
Nepali Forex Pro brings into the android devices a feature packed carefully designed application that helps you get the Foreign Exchange Rates of Nepal on daily basis. This app support 18 currencies  that are highly exchanged in Nepal. The app has capabilities to pull the last 15 days fo data from the Rastra Bank (done via Sanjaal Corps proprietary softwares that populate data for forex.sanjaal.com).  The data is then presented in the graphical and tabular form via various tools available within the application. You can also use this application as a currency conversion tool. The list of supported currencies are:

  • Australian Dollar
  • Canadian Dollar
  • Chinese Yuan
  • Danish Kroner
  • European Dollar
  • Hongkong Dollar
  • Indian Rupees
  • Japanese Yen
  • Malaysian Ringgit
  • Qatar Riyal
  • Saudi Riyal
  • Singapore Dollar
  • Sterling Pound
  • Swedish Kroner
  • Swiss Frank
  • Thai Baht
  • UAE Dirham
  • US Dollar

This app is ad-free. There are absolutely no advertisements and the application collects ZERO data. We want our users to use the application with freedom and privacy on their mind. We listen to our users feedback positively and try to improve upon as much as there is room for improvement. Please direct any of your comments, questions, queries or even your own one liners to be included in our app to CONTACT AT SANJAAL DOT COM.

Usage Video:

Recent Changes and Feature Summary:

  • Exchange Rates pulled directly from Nepal Rashtra Bank on daily basis – the only governing source of exchange rates in Nepal
  • Contains Exchange Rates for 18 highly exchanged foreign currencies
  • Ability to view the Exchange Rate trend (both buy rates and sell rates) graphically
  • Graphs are zoomable with fingers
  • Ability to convert arbitrary amount form supported to foreign currencies to Nepali Rupees
  • Ability to graphically compare exchange rates for two different currencies (e.g. US Dollar vs Canadian Dollar)
  • View the historical exchange rates for last 15 days
  • This app requires active internet connection and has been verified to not force-close when the internet connection is not available, although there will be no data to display if the app cannot connect to interent.
  • This app collect zero data
  • This app is ad-free

Want to know how this app works? Click on the image for bigger version.
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SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.nepali.forexpro

You can scan the following QR code with your android device to download this app:

qr_code_nepali_forex_pro

Contact Us:

If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

Screenshots:
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Best Buddha Quotes (Smartphone App)

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Latest Version:
1.8 – Released on 2013-12-11

About this android app:
The ‘Best Buddha Quotes’ app brings into the android market the hand picked best and greatest quotes by Buddha. There are more than 120 quotes in the database and we have made the navigation extremely user friendly. Whether you want to use the left and right arrow, or just want to swipe the fingers to navigate sequentially through the apps, we have provided those abilities. If you are impatient to go through the quotes sequentially and want a surprise, just shake your phone for a random quote. There is also a ‘Random’ button that when clicked produces a random quote. Beyond the quotes, this app provides information about Buddha, the noble eightfold path and the four noble truth.

This is a great app to learn the simplicity of Buddhism and is a must have app for every Buddhists or curious non-Buddhist to learn the simple truths of life all from the eyes of Enlightened Gautam Buddha.

Since we release the apps for Free, we believe we deserve to monetize them by placing some ads. You can always skip the ads and continue with our fully functional applications.We listen to our users feedback positively and try to improve upon as much as there is room for improvement. Please direct any of your comments, questions, queries or even your own one liners to be included in our app to CONTACT AT SANJAAL DOT COM.

Recent Changes Summary:

v1.8
+ Upgraded to Leadbolt 6.1 to fix some ad related and performance problems reported by users.

v1.7
+ Added 21 new verified quotes by Buddha (now 154 total)
+ Realigned the buttons and some backgrounds for better look
+ Made the text size on buttons bigger
+ Added ability to see app version number in About section
+ Fixed an issue with AppFire

v1.6
+ Fixed a null pointer error introduced in v1.5

v1.5
+ Fixed an error that was preventing users from exiting the app
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 6, included AppFire

v1.4
+ Removed the Notification Bar advertisement to comply with Google’s app policy
+ Removed the Home Icon advertisement to comply with Google’s App Policy
+ Added feature to allow users to rate the app after certain usage
+ Modified the look to have golden background for buttons and some text fields
+ Added Special Offers section with recommendations of some free cool apps
+ Fixed some bugs that caused the app to crash on certain phones

v1.3
+ 123 Quotes by Buddha in the database
+ Navigation via left and right arrow
+ Navigation by finger swipe
+ Random quote generation via phone shake
+ Random quote via ‘Random’ button
+ Information about Buddha
+ Information about Noble Eight Fold Path
+ Information about Four Noble Truths
+ Serene Background

SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.reference.bestbuddhaquotes

You can scan the QR code below to download this app.

qr_code_best_buddha_quotes

Contact Us:

If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

Screenshots:
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About Buddha:
Gautama Buddha or Siddhartha Gautama Buddha was a spiritual teacher born in Kapilvastu which lies in Lumbini Zone in Nepal (which was Indian subcontinent at the time of his birth), on whose teachings Buddhism was founded.

The word Buddha is a title for the first awakened being in an era. In most Buddhist traditions, Siddhartha Gautama is regarded as the Supreme Buddha of our age, “Buddha” meaning “awakened one” or “the enlightened one.” Gautama Buddha may also be referred to as Shakyamuni.

Gautama taught a Middle Way compared to the severe asceticism found in the Sramana (renunciation) movement common in his region. He later taught throughout regions of eastern India such as Magadha and Kosala.

The time of Gautama’s birth and death is uncertain: most historians in the early 20th century dated his lifetime as circa 563 BCE to 483 BCE, but more recent opinion dates his death to between 486 and 483 BCE or, according to some, between 411 and 400 BCE. However, at a specialist symposium on this question held in 1988 in Gottingen, the majority of those scholars who presented definite opinions gave dates within 20 years either side of 400 BCE for the Buddha’s death, with others supporting earlier or later dates. These alternative chronologies, however, have not yet been accepted by all other historians.

Gautama is the primary figure in Buddhism, and accounts of his life, discourses, and monastic rules are believed by Buddhists to have been summarized after his death and memorized by his followers. Various collections of teachings attributed to him were passed down by oral tradition, and first committed to writing about 400 years later.

Most scholars regard Kapilavastu, present-day Nepal, to be the birthplace of the Buddha. According to the most traditional biography, Buddha was born in a royal Hindu family to King Suddhodana, the leader of Shakya clan, whose capital was Kapilavastu, and who were later annexed by the growing Kingdom of Kosala during the Buddha’s lifetime. Gautama was the family name. His mother, Queen Maha Maya (Mayadevi) and Suddhodana’s wife, was a Koliyan princess. Legend has it that, on the night Siddhartha was conceived, Queen Maya dreamt that a white elephant with six white tusks entered her right side, and ten months later Siddhartha was born. As was the Shakya tradition, when his mother Queen Maya became pregnant, she left Kapilvastu for her father’s kingdom to give birth. However, her son is said to have been born on the way, at Lumbini, in a garden beneath a sal tree.

Siddhartha was born in a royal Hindu family. He was brought up by his mother’s younger sister, Maha Pajapati. By tradition, he is said to have been destined by birth to the life of a prince, and had three palaces (for seasonal occupation) built for him. Although more recent scholarship doubts this status, his father, said to be King Suddhodana, wishing for his son to be a great king, is said to have shielded him from religious teachings and from knowledge of human suffering. When he reached the age of 16, his father reputedly arranged his marriage to a cousin of the same age named Yasodhara. According to the traditional account, she gave birth to a son, named Rahula. Siddhartha is then said to have spent 29 years as a prince in Kapilavastu. Although his father ensured that Siddhartha was provided with everything he could want or need, Buddhist scriptures say that the future Buddha felt that material wealth was not life’s ultimate goal.

At the age of 29, the popular biography continues, Siddhartha left his palace to meet his subjects. Despite his father’s efforts to hide from him the sick, aged and suffering, Siddhartha was said to have seen an old man. When his charioteer Channa explained to him that all people grew old, the prince went on further trips beyond the palace. On these he encountered a diseased man, a decaying corpse, and an ascetic. These depressed him, and he initially strove to overcome ageing, sickness, and death by living the life of an ascetic. Accompanied by Channa and aboard his horse Kanthaka, Gautama quit his palace for the life of a mendicant. It’s said that, “the horse’s hooves were muffled by the gods” to prevent guards from knowing of his departure.

Gautama initially went to Rajagaha and began his ascetic life by begging for alms in the street. After King Bimbisara’s men recognised Siddhartha and the king learned of his quest, Bimisara offered Siddhartha the throne. Siddhartha rejected the offer, but promised to visit his kingdom of Magadha first, upon attaining enlightenment.

He left Rajagaha and practised under two hermit teachers. After mastering the teachings of Alara Kalama, he was asked by Kalama to succeed him. However, Gautama felt unsatisfied by the practise, and moved on to become a student of Udaka Ramaputta (Skr. Udraka Rāmaputra). With him he achieved high levels of meditative consciousness, and was again asked to succeed his teacher. But, once more, he was not satisfied, and again moved on.

Siddhartha and a group of five companions led by Kaundinya are then said to have set out to take their austerities even further. They tried to find enlightenment through deprivation of worldly goods, including food, practising self-mortification. After nearly starving himself to death by restricting his food intake to around a leaf or nut per day, he collapsed in a river while bathing and almost drowned. Siddhartha began to reconsider his path. Then, he remembered a moment in childhood in which he had been watching his father start the season’s plowing. He attained a concentrated and focused state that was blissful and refreshing, the jhāna.

According to the early Buddhist texts, after realizing that meditative jhana was the right path to awakening, but that extreme asceticism didn’t work, Gautama discovered what Buddhists call the Middle Way — a path of moderation away from the extremes of self-indulgence and self-mortification. In a famous incident, after becoming starved and weakened, he is said to have accepted milk and rice pudding from a village girl named Sujata. Such was his emaciated appearance that she wrongly believed him to be a spirit that had granted her a wish.

Following this incident, Gautama was famously seated under a pipal tree—now known as the Bodhi tree—in Bodh Gaya, India, when he vowed never to arise until he had found the truth. Kaundinya and four other companions, believing that he had abandoned his search and become undisciplined, left. After a reputed 49 days of meditation, at the age of 35, he is said to have attained Enlightenment. According to some traditions, this occurred in approximately the fifth lunar month, while, according to others, it was in the twelfth month. From that time, Gautama was known to his followers as the Buddha or “Awakened One” (“Buddha” is also sometimes translated as “The Enlightened One”). He is often referred to in Buddhism as Shakyamuni Buddha, or “The Awakened One of the Shakya Clan.”

According to Buddhism, at the time of his awakening he realized complete insight into the cause of suffering, and the steps necessary to eliminate it. These discoveries became known as the “Four Noble Truths”, which are at the heart of Buddhist teaching. Through mastery of these truths, a state of supreme liberation, or Nirvana, is believed to be possible for any being. The Buddha described Nirvana as the perfect peace of a mind that’s free from ignorance, greed, hatred and other afflictive states, or “defilements” (kilesas). Nirvana is also regarded as the “end of the world”, in that no personal identity or boundaries of the mind remain. In such a state, a being is said to possess the Ten Characteristics, belonging to every Buddha.

According to a story in the Ayacana Sutta— a scripture found in the Pāli and other canons — immediately after his awakening, the Buddha debated whether or not he should teach the Dharma to others. He was concerned that humans were so overpowered by ignorance, greed and hatred that they could never recognise the path, which is subtle, deep and hard to grasp. However, in the story, Brahmā Sahampati convinced him, arguing that at least some will understand it. The Buddha relented, and agreed to teach.

About Noble Eightfold Path:
The Noble Eightfold Path is one of the principal teachings of the Buddha, who described it as the way leading to the cessation of suffering (dukkha) and the achievement of self-awakening. It is used to develop insight into the true nature of phenomena (or reality) and to eradicate greed, hatred, and delusion. The Noble Eightfold Path is the fourth of the Buddha’s Four Noble Truths; the first element of the Noble Eightfold Path is, in turn, an understanding of the Four Noble Truths. It is also known as the Middle Path or Middle Way.

The eight noble eightfold path are normally written in the summarized form as:

  1. Right View
  2. Right Intention
  3. Right Speech
  4. Right Action
  5. Right Livelihood
  6. Right Effort
  7. Right Mindfulness
  8. Right Concentration

Four Noble Truths:
The Four Noble Truths are regarded as the central doctrine of the Buddhist tradition, and are said to provide a conceptual framework for all of Buddhist thought. These four truths explain the nature of dukkha (commonly translated as “suffering”, “anxiety”, “stress”, “dissatisfaction”), its causes, and how it can be overcome.

According to the Buddhist tradition, the Buddha first taught the four noble truths in the very first teaching he gave after he attained enlightenment, as recorded in the discourse Setting in Motion the Wheel of the Dharma, and he further clarified their meaning in many subsequent teachings.

The four noble truths are:

  1. The truth of dukkha (suffering, anxiety, dissatisfaction)
  2. The truth of the origin of dukkha
  3. The truth of the cessation of dukkha
  4. The truth of the path leading to the cessation of dukkha

[Some of the text was taken from Wikipedia under Creative Commons License]

You Are Nepali If (Smartphone App)

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Latest Version:
1.4
(Released on 2013-09-14)

About this android app:
This is a fun app. We have written 146 different way you can be Nepali. No pun intended and no offense to anyone – it is just a fun app. It explores the way Nepali People eat, to the way Nepali People party, the taboos they have (for instance Nepali people feel shy to talk about sex in open, let alone kiss your spouse in the public), it touches many aspects of Nepali Life.

YOU ARE NEPALI IF one liners are generated randomly and displayed to the user. Either use the arrow on the top right corner of the landing page of the app or just shake your phone to generate a random one.

Since we release the apps for Free, we believe we deserve to monetize them by placing some ads. You can always skip the ads and continue with our fully functional applications.

We listen to our users feedback positively and try to improve upon as much as there is room for improvement. Please direct any of your comments, questions, queries or even your own one liners to be included in our app to CONTACT AT SANJAAL DOT COM.

SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.nepali.youarenepali

Contact Us:
If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

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You Are Nepali If Android App By SanjaalCorps

Screenshots:

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You Are Nepali If Android App By SanjaalCorps

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You Are Nepali If Android App By SanjaalCorps

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You Are Nepali If Android App By SanjaalCorps

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You Are Nepali If Android App By SanjaalCorps

Release Notes:
Version 1.4
+ User Interface has been revamped to make it cleaner and cool. The buttons use borders and gradient color.
+ Removed the Notification Bar and Home Icon advertisement to comply with Google’s app policy
+ Added feature to allow users to rate the app after certain usage
+ Modified the look to have golden background for buttons and some text fields
+ Added Special Offers section with recommendations of some free cool apps
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 5.1a

Version 1.3
+ User Interface has been revamped to make it cleaner and cool. The buttons use borders and gradient color.
+ Added Finger Swipe – Swipe left or right to get a random “You Are Nepali If”
+ Added more “You Are Nepali If” data to the database
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 5.0 for better user experience with Ads
+ Added the attribution to our contributor
+ Bug Fix – Don’t crash if the ads don’t load

Brazilian National Anthem – Smartphone Application

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Latest Version:
1.6 – released on 2013-12-11

About this android app:
“Brazilian National Anthem” is an android application written for android based smartphones and tablets. This mobile application lets you play the patriotic national anthem “Ouviram Do Ipiranga As Margens Placidas” of Brazil in your android based devices – both phones and tablets. This application is developed by professionals at Sanjaal Corps laboratory. The musical note diagram and the anthem history below is courtesy of Wikipedia.The flags of Brazil and the national anthem music are used under “fair usage” policy and Sanjaal Corps neither has the right to the flag, nor to the lyrics, audio and the musical notations.

SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.android.braziliannationalanthem

You can download this app by scanning the following QR code from your android phone.

qr_code_brazilian_national_anthem

Contact Us:
If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

Screenshots:

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot - Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

Screenshot – Brazilian National Anthem for Android Devices

About Brazilian National Anthem:

The Brazilian national anthem (Portuguese: Hino Nacional Brasileiro) was composed by Francisco Manuel da Silva in 1831 and had been given at least two sets of unofficial lyrics before a 1922 decree by President Epitácio Pessoa gave the anthem its definitive, official lyrics, by Joaquim Osório Duque-Estrada, after several changes were made to his proposal, written in 1909. The anthem’s lyrics have been described as Parnassian in style and Romantic in content.The melody of the Brazilian national anthem was composed by Francisco Manuel da Silva and was presented to the public for the first time in April 1831. On 7 April 1831, the first Brazilian Emperor, Pedro I, abdicated the Crown and days later left for Europe, leaving behind the then-five-year-old Emperor Pedro II. From the proclamation of the independence of Brazil in 1822 until the 1831 abdication, an anthem that had been composed by Pedro I himself, celebrating the country’s independence (and that now continues to be an official patriotic song, the Independence Anthem), was used as the National Anthem. In the immediate aftermath of the abdication of Pedro I, the Anthem composed by him fell in popularity.

Francisco Manuel da Silva then seized this opportunity to present his composition, and the Anthem written by him was played in public for the first time on 13 April 1831. On that same day, the ship carrying the former Emperor left the port of Rio de Janeiro. The date of April 13 now appears in official calendars as the Day of the Brazilian National Anthem. As to the actual date of composition of the music presented in April 1831, there is controversy among historians. Some hold that Francisco Manuel da Silva composed the music in the last four months of 1822 to commemorate Brazil’s independence (declared on 7 September 1822), others hold that the hymn was written in early 1823 and others consider the evidence of composition dating back to 1822 or 1823 unreliable, and hold that the Anthem presented on 13 April 1831 was written in 1831, and not before. In any event, the Anthem remained in obscurity until it was played in public on 13 April 1831. In style, the music resembles early Romantic Italian music such as that of Gioachino Rossini. Initially, the music composed by Francisco Manuel da Silva was given lyrics by Appeals Judge Ovídio Saraiva de Carvalho e Silva not as a National Anthem, but as a hymn commemorating the abdication of Pedro I and the accession of Pedro II to the Throne. It was known during this early period as “April 7 Hymn”. The lyrics by Ovídio Saraiva soon fell out of use, given that they were considered poor, and even offensive towards the Portuguese. The music, however, continued enjoying sustained popularity, and by 1837 it was played, without lyrics, in all public ceremonies.

Although no statute was passed during the imperial period to declare Francisco Manuel da Silva’s musical composition as the National Anthem, no formal enactment was considered necessary for the adoption of a National Anthem. A National Anthem was seen as resulting from praxis or tradition. Thus, by 1837, when it was played in all official solemnities, Francisco Manuel da Silva’s composition was already the Brazilian National Anthem. A new set of lyrics was proposed in 1841, to commemorate the coming of age and Coronation of Emperor Pedro II; those lyrics, popular but also considered poor, were soon abandoned too, this time by order of Emperor Pedro II, who specified that in public ceremonies the Anthem should be played with no lyrics. Emperor Pedro II directed that Francisco Manuel da Silva’s composition, as the National Anthem of the Empire of Brazil, should be played, without lyrics, on all occasions when the monarch presented himself in public, and in solemnities of military or civilian nature; the composition was also played abroad in diplomatic events relating to Brazil or when the Brazilian Emperor was present.

During the Empire of Brazil era, the American composer and pianist Louis Moreau Gottschalk, then residing in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, composed two nationalistic works of classical music based on the Brazilian National Anthem that achieved great popularity during the imperial period: the Brazilian Solemn March (“Marcha Solene Brasileira”, in the modern Portuguese spelling or “Marcha Solemne Brazileira”, in the original spelling in force at the time of composition) and the Great Triumphal Fantasy on the Brazilian National Anthem (“Grande Fantasia Triunfal sobre o Hino Nacional Brasileiro”). The former was dedicated to Emperor Pedro II, and the latter was dedicated to his heiress presumptive, the Princess Imperial Isabel, comtesse d’Eu. Those works are in the vein of similar compositions written at the time in other Nations, such as Charles Gounod’s Fantasy on the Russian National Anthem. The Grand Triumphal Fantasy, long forgotten, resurfaced in popularity in 1985, at the dawn of Brazil’s New Republic, during the country’s re-democratization process, when it was played to accompany the funeral cortège of President Tancredo Neves. After the Proclamation of the Republic in 1889, the new rulers made a competition in order to choose a new anthem, and the competition was won by Leopoldo Miguez. After protests against the adoption of the proposed new anthem, however, the Head of the Provisional Government, Deodoro da Fonseca, formalized Francisco Manuel da Silva’s composition as the National Anthem, while Miguez’s composition was deemed the Anthem of the Proclamation of the Republic. Dedoro himself was said to prefer the old anthem to the new composition that became the Anthem of the Proclamation of the Republic. The Decree of the Provisional Government (Decree 171 of 1890) confirming Francisco Manuel da Silva’s music, that had served as the National Anthem of the Empire of Brazil, as the National Anthem of the new Republic, was issued on 20 January 1890.

In the early days of the new Federal Republic, the National Anthem continued without official lyrics, but several lyrics were proposed, and some were even adopted by different states of Brazil. The lack of uniform, official lyrics would only be terminated in 1922, during the celebrations of the first centennial of the Proclamation of Independence, when an adapted version of Joaquim Osório Duque Estrada’s lyrics, first proposed in 1909, were deemed official. The official lyrics of the Brazilian National Anthem were proclaimed by decree of President Epitácio Pessoa (Decree 15.761 of 1922), issued on 6 September 1922, at the height of the celebrations of the Independence Centennial. This presidential decree was issued in execution of a legislative decree adopted by Congress on 21 August 1922. The National Anthem is considered by the current Constitution of Brazil, adopted in 1988, one of the four national symbols of the country, along with the Flag, the Coat of Arms and the National Seal. The legal norms currently in force concerning the National Anthem are contained in a statute passed in 1971 (Law 5.700 of 1 September 1971), regulating the national symbols. The music of the National Anthem was originally intended to be played by symphonic orchestras; for the playing of the National Anthem by bands, the march composed by Antão Fernandes is included in the instrumentation. This adaptation, long in use, was made official by the 1971 statute regulating national symbols. This same statute also confirmed as official the traditional vocal adaptation of the lyrics of the National Anthem, in F major, composed by Alberto Nepomuceno.

[Text Source: Wikipedia / Creative Commons]

Release Notes:
v1.6
+ Upgraded to Leadbolt 6.1 to fix some ad related and performance problems reported by users.

v1.5
+ UI Changes – Completely changed the Look and Feel to match Brazilian Flag colors
+ Added Free Apps Section
+ Fixed an issue with AppFire

v1.4
+ Fixed an error with exiting an application
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 6
+ Added AppFire for better analytics

v1.3
+ Removed the Notification Bar advertisement to comply with Google’s app policy
+ Removed the Home Icon advertisement to comply with Google’s App Policy
+ Added feature to allow users to rate the app after certain usage
+ Modified the look to have golden background for buttons and some text fields
+ Added Special Offers section with recommendations of some free cool apps
+ Fixed some bugs that caused the app to crash on certain phones
+ LeadBolt 1.5a used

Nepali Ukhan Tukka – Smartphone App

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Nepali Ukhan Tukka App For Android Based Smartphones

Latest Version:
1.9 – released 2013-12-13

About this android app:

Nepali Ukhan Tukkas are sort of Nepali one liners full of wisdom, truth and sometimes satires. People use these ukhan tukkas in spoken Nepali language as well as in written literature. The original authors of these sayings are normally debated or unknown, but they have existed in our Nepali culture for a long time.

The “Nepali Ukhan Tukka” app lets you browse through hand picked, highly meaningful Ukhan Tukkas of Nepal. There are currently 172 Ukhans in our database. Navigation is easy through left and write arrow click. If you want a random Ukhan Tukka generated, just shake your phone or other android devices such as tablet.

If you know more Ukhan Tukkas and would like to contribute to us, the app contains three ways to reach to us. Also, provided in the app are direct download links to some of the other Nepali Apps that Sanjaal Corps has developed over time.

WORD OF CAUTION: This free app is ad supported. If you are bothered with Adverstisements appearing around the application occasionally, please do not install this app.

This application is developed by professionals at Sanjaal Corps laboratory. The images used are obtained from openclipart.org. Ukhan tuakkas are obtained from various resources including internet and books and were hand typed by us.

SDK Support:
This app supports android devices with sdk 2.2 and above

Google Market Link:
https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.sanjaal.nepali.ukhantukka

Contact Us:
If you have any questions, concerns or feedback, please contact us by sending us an email to contact AT sanjaal DOT com

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Nepali Ukhan Tukka Android App By Sanjaal Corps / iCodeJava

Screenshots:

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Nepali Ukhan Tukka Android App By Sanjaal Corps / iCodeJava

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Nepali Ukhan Tukka Android App By Sanjaal Corps / iCodeJava

screenshot-nepali-ukhan-tukka-android-app-v1.6_image-004

Nepali Ukhan Tukka Android App By Sanjaal Corps / iCodeJava

screenshot-nepali-ukhan-tukka-android-app-v1.6_image-005

Nepali Ukhan Tukka Android App By Sanjaal Corps / iCodeJava

Release Notes:

v1.9
+ Upgraded to Leadbolt 6.1 – This will server ads faster without freezing the application

v1.8
+ Fixed an issue with AppFire for Crash Analytics.

v1.7
+ Fixed an issue with ad preventing exit from the app
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt 6.0
+ Included AppFire for better Analytics

v1.6
+ Added feature to allow users to rate the app after certain usage
+ Modified the look to have cool looking bluish buttons
+ Removed the Home Icon and Notification Bar advertisement to comply with Google’s app policy
+ Added Special Offers section with recommendations of some free cool apps
+ Added Direct Download links to Sanjaal’s other Nepali Apps
+ Upgraded to LeadBolt5.1a

v1.4

+ More Ukhan Added
+ Code Cleanup

v1.3
+ Few more Ukhans Added
+ Push Notifications for LeadBolt Added

v1.2
+ Revamped User Interface to have a better font, better background and more “Nepali” feeling
+ Added finger swipe feature – now you can navigate to previous or next Ukhans by swiping your fingers
+ Added a random soft button to help you generate a random Ukhan. (Alternately you can shake your phone to get a random Ukhan)
+ Linked more of our apps in “Our Apps” panel.